Community Partnerships for Healthy Mothers and Children

 

CDC’s Division of Community Health (DCH) has funded the National WIC Association (NWA) to build and strengthen community infrastructure to implement population-based strategies to improve communities' health. During this 3-year cooperative agreement with CDC, NWA is partnering with the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and 32 local WIC agencies to reduce and prevent chronic disease by improving access to healthy food environments and improving access to prevention and disease management services, like WIC. NWA is funding and supporting two cohorts of local WIC agencies in select target states to work with community partners to build and enhance community partnerships, perform community needs assessments, and develop and implement strategies to achieve community health goals. 

By the end of the 3 year project, NWA hopes to achieve the following outcomes: 1) increased collaboration between national and community partners, 2) increased community capacity to implement policy, systems, and environmental improvements, 3) increased messages on the importance of policy, systems, and environmental improvements, 4) increased access to environments with healthy food or beverage options in local communities, and 5) increased opportunities for chronic disease prevention and care through community and clinical linkages in local communities.

“When a community has a garden and sells the fresh produce that they grow, it’s hard to ask a participant to drive or take the bus to a different neighborhood to go to a grocery store.”  - Johns Hopkins WIC explains their involvement in an initiative to allow local farms stands to accept WIC fruit and vegetable checks.  Location: Baltimore, Maryland

“When a community has a garden and sells the fresh produce that they grow, it’s hard to ask a participant to drive or take the bus to a different neighborhood to go to a grocery store.”

 - Johns Hopkins WIC explains their involvement in an initiative to allow local farms stands to accept WIC fruit and vegetable checks.  Location: Baltimore, Maryland

Mapping analysis conducted by Virginia Tech’s Office of Economic Development (OED) revealed that the Twin County portion of the Mount Rogers Health District region does not suffer from a lack of physical access to healthier food options, so OED recommended developing strategies for marketing and promoting healthier food choices in an effort to change the purchasing behavior of convenience store patrons.  Location: Marion, Virginia

Mapping analysis conducted by Virginia Tech’s Office of Economic Development (OED) revealed that the Twin County portion of the Mount Rogers Health District region does not suffer from a lack of physical access to healthier food options, so OED recommended developing strategies for marketing and promoting healthier food choices in an effort to change the purchasing behavior of convenience store patrons.  Location: Marion, Virginia